LMR-100 vs RG316 | Product Knockout

“Our Product Knock-out series is a match-up between two similar products. In boxing terms, think same weight class, same caliber, and same level of experience and amount of exposure. The purpose of these posts are for you to see a side-by-side view of two similar products, and to be able to understand which one will be crowned champ for your specific purposes. Take your seats and prepare for battle, because the gloves are coming out.”

LMR 100 and RG316 have some similarities and some differences. This product knockout post is going to examine the characteristics of LMR-100 vs RG316 cable. The two will then be compared and contrasted. Let’s take a closer look at these two cables.

What is LMR 100 Cable?

LMR 100 is a flexible, low loss, communication cable. This cable is ideal in applications such as short antenna feeder runs and jumper assemblies that are mostly in wireless communication systems. LMR 100 can also be used in applications that require easily routed, low-loss cable such as WLL, GPS, WLAN, etc. This cable features a flexible outer conductor which allows the tightest bend radius of any cable that is similar is size and performance. It also boasts the lowest loss of any flexible cable. LMR cable may be used as a drop in replacement for RG 316 or RG 174 cable.

What is RG 316 Cable?

RG 316 is a coax, military rated, communication cable. This cable can be used in applications such as military equipment, direct burial, transmission of radio frequency signals, and telecommunications. It can also be used for high frequency interconnections between PCB in telecommunications equipment. RG-316 is also an ideal choice for applications that require high performance and stability in high temperature environments or in applications that have minimal installation space.  RG316 coax is also a low loss cable. Due to the large size of its conductor, the attenuation of RG316 is lower than other options in this category. This cable is also in accordance with MIL-DTL-17 specifications. This part is M17/113-RG316.

LMR 100 vs RG316 Cable

LMR 100 cable and RG 316 cable have some similarities and some differences. The cables are also both coaxial cables used in communications/telecommunications applications. They both have an impedance of 50 ohms. Below is a chart that compares the similarity of low loss/attenuation characteristics. As the chart shows, the low loss is comparable at a variety of different frequencies, but the LMR-100 cable performs slightly better. Both of these cables have low loss, or attenuation characteristics.

LMR-100 Loss (Attenuation dB/100ft) RG316 Loss (Attenuation dB/100ft)
30 MHz 3.9 4.3
50 MHz 5.1 5.6
1500 MHz 30.1 32

As the chart shows below these cables are constructed differently. LMR-100 has a conductor that is solid bare copper clad steel, where RG316 has a stranded silver covered copper clad steel conductor. RG-316 having a stranded conductor, makes it more flexible than the solid conductor of LMR-100. Another major difference one can see from the chart is that RG316 has a higher temperature rating. The higher temperature rating is made possible by the jacket type of RG-316 coax which is Fluorinated Ethylene Copper (FEP). This allows the cable to be used in specific applications that require that higher temperature environment in comparison to the LMR-100.

lmr-100, rg316, rg-316, lmr-100 cable

LMR-100 vs RG316

LMR-100 vs RG316 Specs for Construction
LMR-100 RG316
Conductor Type Solid Bare Copper Clad Steel Stranded Silver Covered Copper Clad Steel
Dielectric Material Solid Polyethylene (PE) Solid Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)
Outer Conductor Aluminum Tape Silver Covered Copper Braid
Jacket PVC or FRPE Fluorinated Ethylene Copper (FEP)
Temperature -40°C to +85°C -55°C to + 200°C

Although LMR 100 can be used as a drop in replacement for RG 316, it does not have a mil-spec call out. This is another major difference when we compare LMR 100 vs RG316. RG 316 coax has a military call out, M17/113-RG316.

Winner by unanimous vote? Instead, it seems as if the match has ended in a technical decision.
In this case it looks like our crowned champ depends on your specific application use.

If you’re unsure about what cable you’ll need in order to meet the needs of your application, consult with one of Allied’s knowledgeable sales reps by submitting an RFQ. Visit our website to learn more about LMR 100 Cable or RG-316 Cable.

Clarkson University’s Zero-Emission Snowmobile SAE Team Update

 Last month you read how Allied Wire & Cable helped the Clarkson University Zero Emission Snowmobile SAE Team prepare for the SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge. The challenge took place at Michigan Technical Institute in Houghton, MI.

Allied’s contribution has greatly helped the Clarkson Electric Knights reach their goal of placing in the top three at the 2017 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge. We are happy to report that The Electric Knights placed 2nd overall.  This ranking has been their personal best since 2010.

The Zero Emission category at the Clean Snowmobile Challenge consisted of twelve events that took place from March 6th – 11th 2017. The events were listed as follows: Design Paper, Static Display, MSRP Report, Subjective Handling, Range, Oral Presentation, Noise, Draw Bar Pull, Cold Start, Vehicle Weight, Objective Handling, and Acceleration Under Load. At this year’s competition the Electric Knights took 1st place in both the cold start event and draw bar pull. They had a max pull of 627 lbs and a vehicle weight of 858 lbs. The team also finished with the fastest time (55.16 seconds) in the objective handling event. The acceleration under load event requires one snowmobile to pull another snowmobile 400 feet as quick as possible.  The Electric Knight’s sled finished in 1.29 seconds right after the 21.27 seconds of the winner.

Unfortunately, The Electric Knights ran into some complications with their battery pack leaving them unable to finish the noise and range events. However, this was the first year The Electric – Knight competed in all events since 2011.

Allied could not be more proud of the accomplishment from Clarkson’s Electric Knights. Job well done to everyone involved!

 

Allied Encyclopedia: CampusLink Single Jacket – Dry DRLDB Fiber Optic Cable

What is CampusLink Single Jacket Dry Riser Fiber Optic Cable?

CampusLink Single Jacket Dry Riser Fiber Optic Cable is loose tube fiber optic cable used in indoor-outdoor applications. It is specifically used in aerial lashed, duct and direct buried applications.

The CampusLink  Loose Tube Indoor/Outdoor Dry Riser has many features and benefits. These include fiber identification using TIA standard color coding and a flame retardant, black UV-resistant outer jacket. This particular CampusLink fiber optic cable has dry buffer tubes to simplify access and reduces prep time.  This cable also has the benefits of flexible kick-resistant buffer tubes, bend insensitive single mode optical fibers, and support of high performance networks.

Construction of a Fiber Optic Cable

The CampusLink Single Jacket Dry Riser Fiber Optic Cable is defined by its construction. In this example we will examine the single mode options of this cable. See the tables below for specifications.

  1. Length Markings
F = feet
M = meters
  1. Product Family
Riser/FT4 ⎸Dry Tubes ⎸OFNR/FT4
  • DRLDB = Indoor-Outdoor Riser All-Dielectric (single jacket) 2 to 288
  1. Construction
(blank) = none
AJ = Jacketed aluminum
SJ = Jacketed steel

  1. Fiber Grouping
12 = 12f per unit or tube

  1. Fiber Type
Single-Mode
HB = Single-Mode (ITU G.652 C & D) Low Water Peak
ES = Enhanced Single-Mode (ITU G.652 C & D)
CE = Corning™ SMF28e+ Single-Mode
B1 = Bend-Insensitive Single-Mode (ITU G.657.A1 & G.652.D)
B2 = Bend-Insensitive Single-Mode (ITU G.657.A2 & .B2, & G.652.D)
  1. Fiber Count
002 to 288 fibers

  1. Fiber Grade

Single-Mode

Attenuation (dB/km) Wavelength (nm) Fiber Type
E1 = 0.40/0.40/0.30 1310/1383/1550 HB, ES, or CE
E3 = 0.35/0.35/0.25 1310/1383/1550 HB, ES, B1, B2 or CE


Below we will break down the construction of a fiber optic cable. The part number we will be dissecting is F DRLDB AJ 12 HB 048 E3.

  • F = Feet
  • DRLDB = Indoor/Outdoor Riser All-Dielectric Single Jacket
  • AJ = Jacketed Aluminum
  • 12 = 12f per unit or tube
  • HB = Single Mode (ITU G.652 C & D) Low Water Peak
  • 048 = 48 fibers
  • E3 = attenuation

From the breakdown of this cable we are able to see that this cable is an indoor-outdoor single mode, single jacket riser fiber optic cable. It’s family is Riser/FT4 ⎸Dry Tubes ⎸OFNR/FT4. It has an aluminum jacket with 48 fibers, 12 fibers per unit, and is has an E3 attenuation classification. 
If you would like to learn more about the entire CampusLink series, specifics on CampusLink Dry Single Riser fiber optic cables or to see all Prysmian/Draka Fiber Optic Cables visit our website. If you would prefer, call one of our experienced sales reps today at 1-800-472-4655!

Price Increase Alert – Belden

Price Increase AlertMarch not only brings the changing of the seasons, it also brings changing in prices. Belden will be increasing prices on select premise cable products by 2.5% to 6.9%. This increase will go into effect starting March 21, 2017. This adjustment is due to wage inflation and rising raw material costs. This will be the first time Belden will be raising prices on this product family.

Be sure to check out our Belden Catalog online Talk to your rep or submit a Belden RFQ now to get your orders in before prices go up.

Allied Donates to Clarkson University’s Zero-Emission Snowmobile SAE Team

snowmobile-collage

This March, Allied Wire & Cable will play a part in the SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge at Michigan Technical Institute. Allied made a donation to help the Clarkson University Zero-Emission Snowmobile SAE Team located in Potsdam, NY. The competition is conducted through the Society of Automotive Engineers. SAE encourages those involved to be innovative, including using time for networking and learning to be a sound engineer through the design and build process.

 

The Clarkson University Zero-Emission Snowmobile SAE team is a group of dedicated, undergraduate engineering students participating in an international collegiate design competition that challenges students to develop and build an electric snowmobile. The teams says this will be done by replacing an internal combustion engine with an electric motor on a stock snowmobile chassis. During the academic year, the team will be applying the principles that they have learned in the classroom and putting them towards a real world application to build a competitive snowmobile in Michigan.

 

Allied Wire & Cable donated hundreds of feet of wire to the Clarkson team for their snowmobile. Some of the wires donated  to the Clarkson team were UL 1007 Hook Up Wire of 07-22-7T, 07-16-26T and 1569-12-65T. The wire will be used throughout the entire snowmobile in every electrical aspect. For example, the areas of focus will be the controls and operation of the tractive system, the safety circuits and other components that are incorporated to ensure the vehicle is operating under safe and normal conditions. The systems also include the isolation monitoring device, battery management system, accelerator lever position sensor and brake pedal plausibility check systems. Allied’s wire products will also play a role from the low voltage control circuit to the high voltage battery pack monitoring and cell balancing.

Check back with us in March to see how the Clarkson team did in their competition!

Gel Buffer Tubes vs. Dry Buffer Tubes | Product Knockout

Product_Knockout

“Our Product Knock-out series is a match-up between two similar products. In boxing terms, think same weight class, same caliber, and same level of experience and amount of exposure. The purpose of these posts are for you to see a side-by-side view of two similar products, and to be able to understand which one will be crowned champ for your specific purposes. Take your seats and prepare for battle, because the gloves are coming out.”

It is important to define and discuss what buffer tubes are in relation to fiber optic cable before comparing and contrasting gel and dry. Buffer tubes are used in fiber optic cable to block water from getting inside the tubes and disrupting the fiber. The prevention of water is especially important in environments where the freezing of water can occur and expand, which will break the optical fiber.

What are Gel Filled Buffer Tubes?

Gel in a fiber optic cable serves as blockage of water to the cable itself. The gel fills the entire part of the tube that is not occupied by the fiber itself. In addition to blocking water from getting to the fiber optic cable, the gel also provides an additional protective layer for the fiber. It also creates cohesion between the fiber and the tube. Now, let’s talk about dry buffer tubes.

What are Dry Buffer Tubes?

Dry buffer tubes are also used to block water from reaching the core of a fiber optic cable. This is done by using materials such as strings, tapes, and foams. These materials are often treated with some kind of super absorbent polymer (SAP) within the tube. The material and SAP absorbs any water that enters the tube and blocks the tube from further water infiltration. In most conditions the SAP will dry and reactivate, which will provide long term protection to the fiber optic cable.

Gel vs. Dry Buffer Tubes

Dry and gel buffer tubes have some similarities but are mostly defined by their differences. Both types of buffer tubes are used to block water from reaching the fiber in the cable. They also both act as a filler within the tube between the outer part of the cable and the core.

The differences of the two types of buffer tubes stand out more than the similarities. To start, one is gel insulation and one is dry. The gel fills the entire tube to block water. The dry fills part of the tube and then expands to absorb the water that gets inside the cable. A slight disadvantage to dry buffer tubes is that the SAP (super absorbent polymer) may not perform the same every time water infiltrates the tube. A disadvantage of the gel is that it is messy when a cable is spliced and requires cleaning. The dry buffers require no cleanup, which makes for easier cutting and splicing. However, when it comes to the gel, it stands up better to things such as salt water, where the dry will break down over time if repeatedly exposed to salt water.

buffer-tube-types, gel buffer tubes, dry buffer tubes, gel, dry

Gel vs. Dry

Winner by unanimous vote? Instead, it seems as if the match has ended in a technical decision.
In this case it looks like our crowned champ depends on your specific application use.

If you’re unsure about what cable or what kind of buffer tube you’ll need in order to meet the needs of your application, consult with one of Allied’s knowledgeable sales reps by submitting an RFQ. Visit our website to learn more about fiber optic cable and all of our Prysmian/Draka Group products.

Single Mode vs. Multi Mode | Product Knockout

Product_Knockout“Our Product Knock-out series is a match-up between two similar products. In boxing terms, think same weight class, same caliber, and same level of experience and amount of exposure. The purpose of these posts are for you to see a side-by-side view of two similar products, and to be able to understand which one will be crowned champ for your specific purposes. Take your seats and prepare for battle, because the gloves are coming out.”

Before this post gets into the compare and contrast of single-mode and multi-mode, it’s important to know what a mode is. To put it simply, a mode is the path that a light beam travels down the fiber. Single-mode and multi-mode both feature a core that allows light to travel down the center of the fiber and carry signals. However, the differences outweigh the similarities, so let’s take a closer look at the differences in these two kinds of cables.

What is Single-Mode Fiber?

Single-mode fiber optic cable is the simplest type of optical fiber. Signals that are in a single-mode fiber travel straight down the center of the core without bouncing off the edges. This type of mode is also very small with a very thin core. The core of a single-mode fiber optic cable is 5-10 microns in diameter which translates to millionths of a meter. Single-mode fiber optic cable is wrapped together in a large bundle and used in telephone signals, cable TV and internet applications. The signal from a single-mode fiber optic cable can travel over 100 km (60 miles). In single-mode fiber optic cable the MFD (mode field diameter) is large and easy to splice/connect. This also makes it sensitive to microbends. Microbends describe the source of signal loss or attenuation in fiber optic cable. 

What is Multi-Mode Fiber?

Multi-mode fiber is a more complex type of optical fiber. These fibers are larger than single-mode fibers at roughly ten times the diameter.  This size allows light beams to travel through the core by a variety of different paths/modes.  These paths can be straight through the core, or the light can be bounced off the edges. Multi-mode cables are used in applications where short distances are used, such as linking computer networks.

Single-Mode vs. Multi-Mode Fiber

When comparing single-mode and multi-mode fiber, the only real similarity between them is that they are both ways to send fiber optic signals.

singlemode_multimode

Single-mode vs. Multi-mode

Single-mode is smaller and used in applications where a signal needs to be sent great distances. In contrast, multi-mode is used in applications where short distances are being used. Single-mode only allows one signal to be sent straight down the core of the fiber, where multi-mode allows multiple signals to be sent and bounced off the edges of the core. In single mode fiber optic cable the MFD (mode field diameter) is larger than in multi-mode due to the core sizes. In single-mode the core is smaller, so the MFD is larger, where in multi-mode the core is larger which means the MFD is smaller. 

Winner by unanimous vote? Instead, it seems as if the match has ended in a technical decision.
In this case it looks like our crowned champ depends on your specific application use.
If you’re unsure about what cable or what mode you’ll need in order to meet the needs of your application, consult with one of Allied’s knowledgeable sales reps by submitting an RFQ.
Visit our website to learn more about fiber optic cable and all of our Prysmian/Draka Group products.

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