Tray Cable vs Teck Cable | Product Knockout

Tray Cable vs Teck C able | Product KnockoutOur Product Knock-out series is a match-up between two similar products. In boxing terms, think same weight class, same caliber, and same level of experience and amount of exposure. The purpose of these posts are for you to see a side-by-side view of two similar products, and to be able to understand which one will be crowned champ for your specific purposes. Take your seats and prepare for battle, because the gloves are coming out.

Tray cable and teck cable are power cables both used for direct burial purposes. Although teck cable is rated to Canadian standards, (CSA) both teck and tray cables have many overlapping similarities. Let’s begin by taking a closer look at each of these cables!

What is Tray Cable?

Tray cables are multi-conductor and multi-paired cables generally used in signal and energy transmission with minimum interference, as well as for installation in trays, wireways, troughs, ducts, conduits, and channels. There are several different types of tray cable, including Type TC Tray Cable, Power Limited Tray Cable (Type PLTC), Instrument Tray Cable (Type ITC), Wind Turbine Tray Cable (Type WTTC), and Exposed Run Tray Cable (TC-ER). Depending on your specific application’s needs, one tray cable rating may work better than another.

What is Teck Cable?

Teck cable, known as TECK90 Cable, is CSA approved cable rated 600 to 5kV. Teck cable is found in single and multiple conductor constructions with an inner jacket, aluminum or steel interlocked armor, with a PVC jacket overall. Often dual rated NEC type MC cable, TECK90 is designed for use in hazardous applications (HL Rated), often mining; petroleum; chemical; and pulp and paper industries.

Tray Cable Teck Cable
Conductor Bare Copper or Tinned Copper depending on rating

Available in multi-conductor, multi-pair or multi-triad configurations

Bare Copper or Aluminum;

Available in single conductor, multi-conductor and composite configurations

Insulation Many options available including PVC/Nylon, XLPE and EPR Most commonly XLPE and EPR but others may be available
Shielding Optional, can be overall, individually, or both; Most commonly unshielded, but optional in form of tape shield or
Jacket Many options available including PVC, CPE Most commonly PVC
Armor Only when rated Type MC AIA ALUMINUM INTERLOCKED ARMOUR or GSIA Galvanized Steel Interlocked Armor
Temperature rating Depends on materials used; typically 90°C -40°C to 90°C
Voltage 150V for ITC, 300V for PLTC and 600V for TC; WTTC can be rated up to 1000V 600V, 1000V, 5kV, even up to 28kV  as HVTECK
Approving agency UL / NEC (can be CSA dual rated) CSA (can be dual rated to UL Type MC)

Tray Cable vs Teck Cable

There is a lot of overlap between teck cable and tray cable when it comes to their construction. Both are capable of featuring bare copper conductors, XLPE and EPR insulation, and PVC jackets. However, there are a few significant differences that set these cables apart as well. All teck cable features a bare copper ground wire in the construction which provides a conducting path from the wire to its end point. Teck cable is also always armored. Although there are certain tray cables with grounds and armor, not all types of tray cables offer these features, like teck cable does.

Tray Cable vs Teck Cable

Tray Cable vs Teck Cable

Winner by unanimous vote? Instead, it seems as if the match has ended in a technical decision. In this case it looks like our crowned champ depends on your specific application use.

If you’re unsure about what cable you’ll need in order to meet the needs of your application, consult with a qualified engineer or with one of Allied’s knowledgeable sales reps. Visit the main product pages here to learn more about tray cable vs teck cable.

Allied Encyclopedia: UL3239 and UL10475

What type of hookup wire features a wide range of high voltage ratings, up to 60kV? You may have guessed it—we’re talking about UL3239 wire.

UL 3239 features a single conductor, available in a variety of sizes depending on the conductor material.

View the chart below for size ranges and corresponding conductor materials of UL 3239:

UL 3239 Conductor Options
Conductor Material Size Range Notes
Copper 10-24 AWG Can be tinned, silver or nickel plated; heat bonded or overcoated
Nickel 10-24 AWG
Aluminum 10-12 AWG Permitted for a 90°C maximum operating temperature
Resistance Wire 20-27 AWG Solid or Stranded
Coated High Strength Copper 10-24 AWG Solid or Stranded; minimum 90% conductivity

According to the UL 3239 spec, the insulation can be extruded or non-extruded thermoplastic and/or thermosetting. This high temperature hook up wire has a temperature range of -40°C to +150°C, but depending on the material, UL 3239 can be rated up to 200°C. The voltage is dependent on the size of the cable, with a range up to 60kV, typically found in increments of 5kV. The insulation thickness increases to accommodate the high voltage rating, resulting in high outer diameters depending on the voltage of the cable.

A similar style high temperature, high voltage hook up wire is UL 10475. The spec for UL 10475 states the the conductor, size 2 AWG to 30 AWG can be solid or stranded, and requires the insulation to be either PTFE or Silicone Rubber. UL10475 wire is rated up to 200°C and up to 50kV.

UL 3239/10475 wire

UL 3239 wire

Many manufacturers group these two UL style wires together since the specs overlap. Since UL3239 spec stops at 10 AWG, the spec allows for a similar product to be extended down to 2 AWG as UL 10475. The wire Allied carries is made with nickel-plated copper and silicone rubber, which is easy for stripping and has high dielectric strength. Both must pass vertical flame tests, however UL3239 must also pass the VW-1 flame test.

These wires are recommended for use in high temperature electronic devices, like stoves, heaters, furnaces and dryers. UL 3239 and UL10475 are also good options for applications involving small areas of wiring as well, like in signs, motors and lighting fixtures.

For more information and to see full UL 3239/10475 specs, visit our UL3239/10475 page.

MTW vs THHN | Product Knockout

Product_KnockoutOur Product Knock-out series is a match-up between two similar products. In boxing terms, think same weight class, same caliber, and same level of experience and amount of exposure. The purpose of these posts are for you to see a side-by-side view of two similar products, and to be able to understand which one will be crowned champ for your specific purposes. Take your seats and prepare for battle, because the gloves are coming out.

MTW wire and THHN wire are electrical PVC wires used in building applications. MTW and THHN are built in accordance with the National Electrical Code for general purpose wiring for installation in conduit or other recognized raceway. These cables share several overlapping characteristics, although there are a few distinct differences that set them apart.

What is MTW wire?

MTW wire stands for Machine Tool Wire, and as the name implies, its primary uses are related to the wiring of machine tools, appliances, and control cabinets. MTW wire is PVC hookup wire, and features either a stranded bare or tinned copper conductor and is known for being durable and flexible. This wire is resistant to heat, moisture, oil, and gasoline, and is rated for up to 600V and for use from -25°C to 90°C. MTW wire passes the VW-1 Flame Test and meets several UL ratings.

What is THHN wire?

THHN wire stands for Thermoplastic High Heat-resistant Nylon, and as we can tell from the name, this wire is made of thermoplastic material (PVC insulation), can withstand high temperatures, and features a nylon jacket. THHN wire is primarily used to carry electrical currents to external power sources. This wire is rated for up to 600V and up to 90°C in dry locations, and 75°C in wet locations. THHN wire features either a bare copper or aluminum conductor, and comes in both stranded or solid, depending on the size.

MTW vs THHN

MTW vs THHN Specs for Construction
MTW Wire THHN Wire
Conductor Size 22 AWG-1000 MCM 14 AWG-1000 MCM
Conductor Type Stranded Solid or Stranded
Conductor Material Bare or Tinned Copper Bare Copper or Aluminum
Insulation Material Polyvinylchloride (PVC) Polyvinylchloride (PVC) with Nylon Jacket
Max. Temperature 90°C 90°C
Max. Voltage 600V 600V

Although both MTW wire and THHN wire are well suited for use in similar applications, there are a few characteristics that set them apart and can make a big difference when trying to decide which type of cable will best meet your needs. MTW and THHN can both feature a bare copper conductor, however THHN is available with an aluminum conductor, depending on size. THHN wire is less flexible than MTW wire for two reasons. At the core MTW offers a higher strand count in the conductor, making it more flexible than THHN, which also features a nylon coating that further restricts movement.

MTW vs THHN

MTW vs THHN

Winner by unanimous vote? Instead, it seems as if the match has ended in a technical decision. In this case it looks like our crowned champ depends on your specific application use.

If you’re unsure if THHN or MTW would work best for your wire and cable needs, let Allied help you out! Compare full THHN and MTW specs or give your sales rep a call at 800-472-5655 with any questions.

Product Knockout: UL1061 vs UL1007

Product_KnockoutOur Product Knock-out series is a match-up between two similar products. In boxing terms, think same weight class, same caliber, and same level of experience and amount of exposure. The purpose of these posts are for you to see a side-by-side view of two similar products, and to understand which one will be crowned champ for your specific purposes. Take your seats and prepare for battle, because the gloves are coming out.

UL1061 wire and UL1007 wire are both UL approved, single conductor wires commonly used for the internal wiring of electronic equipment. They are part of the classification known as hook-up wire and lead wire; they’re both similar in size, material, and overall construction.

Read on to discover the differences in construction and electrical specs between these lead wires:

UL1061 vs UL1007 Specs for Construction
UL 1061 UL1007
Conductor Size 14-30 AWG 16-32 AWG
Conductor Type Solid or Stranded Solid or Stranded
Conductor Material Bare or Tinned Copper Bare or Tinned Copper
Insulation Thickness .009” (9 mils minimum average thickness, 7 mils minimum thickness at any point.) .016” (15 mils minimum average thickness, 13 mils minimum thickness at any point)
Insulation Material Semi-Rigid Polyvinylchloride (SR-PVC) Polyvinylchloride (PVC)

The construction of these wires is similar in that they both feature a single conductor and insulation. They both can have solid or stranded copper conductors, which can be bare or tinned, but are made with different insulation materials—UL 1061 comes in SR-PVC and UL1007 comes in PVC insulation, both of which are extruded.

The most noticeable difference between UL 1061 and UL1007, aside from the insulation material, is the insulation thickness, which affects the overall weight and size.

UL1061 vs UL1007 Electrical Specs
UL 1061 UL1007
Max. Temperature Rating 80°C 80°C
Max. Voltage 300 300

The electrical specifications of  UL1061 and UL1007 don’t vary at all; both have a maximum voltage of 300V and comparable temperature ranges. Both wires also pass the UL VW-1 Flame test.

Due to their construction, these hook-up wires can often be found as dual rated with other UL Styles, CSA Styles and even Mil-Spec styles. Allied carries the following versions:

UL1061 vs UL1007 Dual Ratings & Specs
UL 1061 UL1007
UL Style UL Style 10002 (105°C) UL Style 1569 (105°C)
CSA Style CSA Type SR-PVC CSA TR-64 (90°C)
Mil-Spec Style Mil-W-16878/1 Type B (105°C, 600V)(depending on size and stranding) N/A

The dual rating can extend some of the specifications of a cable. For example, on the sizes where our UL Style 1007 wire is dual rated with UL 1569, it can be rated to 105°C when used in an application where UL approval is required. When AWC’s dual rated UL 1061 wire is used in a mil-spec environment, it rated up to 105°C and 600 volts.

Ul1061 vs UL1007

Ul1061 vs UL1007

Winner by unanimous vote? Instead, it seems as if the match has ended in a technical decision. In this case it looks like our crowned champ depends on your specific application use.

If you are unsure about what cable you’ll need in order to meet the needs of your application, consult with a qualified engineer or with one of Allied’s knowledgeable sales reps. Visit our website to learn more about UL 1061 and UL 1007.

Allied Encyclopedia: SIS Cable

Allied Encyclopedia SIS Cable is lead wire commonly used in switchboards, and is often referred to as Switchboard Wire. The construction is simple; just a conductor and insulation.

The conductor is made of soft annealed tinned or bare copper, which can be solid or stranded, and is available in a range of sizes from 14 AWG to 4/0 AWG. SIS wire is insulated with cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) and comes in a variety of colors for easy identification, but gray is the most common color.

SIS cable can be dual rated as UL 3173, UL 3195, UL 3196, or as XHHW-2, depending on the AWG size. UL3173 is dual rated as SIS in sizes 10 AWG and smaller, UL3195 in only size 8 AWG, and UL3196 in sizes 6 AWG to 2 AWG.

SIS Wire

SIS Wire

The printing on UL 3173/3195/3196 is also dependent on AWG size. Size 14 AWG and larger is printed with “SIS” for switchboard application use, and sizes 16 AWG -18 AWG are printed with “Suitable for Switchboard Use”.

UL 3173/3195/3196 cables have a temperature rating of 125°C. UL Type SIS and XHHW-2 are rated to 90°C and also carry the UL VW-1 rating. Switchboard wire has a voltage rating of 600V for all UL styles.

Though this wire has just a few defining characteristics, it can still be used in many applications besides switchboards, like panelboards, distribution boards, low voltage applications, and interconnection of protective devices where optimum performance is required.

To see more SIS cable specs, visit our switchboard wire page. If you have any questions, contact your sales rep at 800-472-4655.

RG213 vs LMR400 | Product Knockout

Product KnockoutOur Product Knock-out series is a match-up between two similar products. In boxing terms, think same weight class, same caliber, and same level of experience and amount of exposure. The purpose of these posts are for you to see a side-by-side view of two similar products, and to be able to understand which one will be crowned champ for your specific purposes. Take your seats and prepare for battle, because the gloves are coming out.

RG213 and LMR400 are both coaxial cables that have a wide variety of uses. RG213 coax is suitable in applications where low signal loss and high voltage operations are required. This includes radio communications, electrical and data transmission, broadcast, and computer applications. LMR400 is a flexible low loss braided coaxial cable designed for use in low loss RF cables. Both LMR400 and RG213 have a lot of overlapping characteristics, however that are a few differences that set them apart and can make a big difference when deciding which cable will work best depending on your electrical requirements.

RG213 vs LMR400 Specs for Construction
RG213 LMR400
Conductor Type Stranded (7/0.030) Solid
Conductor Size (in) 0.089 0.108
Conductor Material Bare Copper Bare Copper Clad Aluminum
Dielectric Diameter 0.285 0.285
Dielectric Material Solid Low Density Polyethylene Foam Polyethylene
Shield Single Bare Copper Braid 1st Shield: 100% Aluminum Braid

2nd Shield: Braided Tinned Copper

Jacket PVC PE
Overall Diameter (in) 0.405 0.405
Weight 110 lbs/mft 68 lbs/mft

Although these two cables are often compared, there are several construction differences, starting with the very core. RG213 features a stranded bare copper conductor, while LMR400 features a solid bare copper clad aluminum conductor. RG213 coax also offers a PVC jacket, while LMR400 coax features a PE jacket. The outer conductor of these cables, also referred to as the shielding, is another significant difference that sets these two coaxial cables apart. RG213 simply has a single bare copper braid, while LMR400 has a double shield composed of an aluminum braid and braided tinned copper.

RG214 vs RG213 Electrical Specs
RG213 LMR400
Min. Temperature Rating -40°C -40°C
Max. Temperature Rating 75°C 85°C
Max. Voltage 5,000 2,500
Impedance (ohms) 50 50
Capacitance (pF/ft) 32.2 23.9
Max. Freq. (GHz) 11 6

In regards to electrical specifications, these cables differ mainly in terms of their maximum voltage rating, capacitance, and maximum frequency. RG213 is able to withstand double the voltage rating of LMR400, however LMR400 coax exceeds RG213 in both loss and power handling as is apparent by the chart below.

RG213 Loss (Attenuation dB/100ft) LMR400 Loss (Attenuation dB/100ft)
100 MHz 2.2 1.2
400 MHz 4.8 2.5
1000 MHz 8.2 4.1

There are several factors that play a role in signal loss, and in this case, the different conductors are at the root of the attenuation differences. The rule of thumb here is the larger the conductor, the less the attenuation. Because LMR400 has a larger conductor than RG213, the conductor size accounts for RG213 experiencing more signal loss than LMR400.

RG213 vs LMR400

Winner by unanimous vote? Instead, it seems as if the match has ended in a technical decision. In this case it looks like our crowned champ depends on your specific application use.

If you are unsure about what cable you’ll need in order to meet the needs of your application, consult with a qualified engineer or with one of Allied’s knowledgeable sales reps. To learn more about RG213 vs LMR400, visit the coaxial cable main product page.

Allied Encyclopedia: Festoon Cable

What is Festoon Cable?

Simply put, festoon cable is a flat portable cord. Although, if you dissect the name itself, you’ll find there’s a lot more to this seemingly simple cable.

Let’s start with the name — ‘festoon’ is a word that often refers to something suspended in a curve between two points.

This may help in remembering common applications for festoon cables; they are typically used in cranes, hoists, and other suspension applications.

What is the construction of festoon cable?

Festoon cable is made of finely stranded bare copper conductors at its very core. The size of this cable ranges from 4/0 AWG to 16 AWG, and features either PVC insulation and jacket or neoprene insulation and jacket. The PVC version of this cable comes in black or yellow, while the neoprene is only available in black.

The neoprene version is more flexible than PVC because its conductors can have a higher strand count, meaning it can be used in continuous flexing applications.

Even though these versions vary slightly, they’re still similar. They both have small bending radii, contributing to each cable’s flexibility, and these cables still have many of the same applications.

Festoon Cable 14/12C

Festoon Cable with 12 conductors, sized 14 AWG

What are the applications?

The unique, flat construction of festoon cable allows it to be stacked when space is at a minimum. The flat construction also helps with anti-coiling in all applications. This cable is commonly used as trailing cable for crane installations, elevator control cables, conveyor systems, and shelf control units.

PVC and neoprene festoon cables are flame retardant and resistant to oil, fat, acid, and lye.  While both can be used in dry or damp environments, neoprene offers more weather resistance over PVC.

To see full festoon cable specs, visit our Festoon Cable page.

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